How to Get Away with Blogging | On Campus vs. Off Campus

Welcome to this new section we like to call Pros and Cons, where we channel our inner Leslie Knope and create pros and cons to help us make decisions in our lives. First on the agenda is the issue of housing: is it better to live on-campus or off-campus? Rachel lives in SoGo, which is objectively the best dorm to live in on-campus. Merilla, on the other hand, lives in an off-campus house somewhere nearby Tufts. Let’s get ready to rumble!!

Pros to On Campus: Location, Location, Location
We both have 10:30 a.m. classes. Living off-campus, Merilla wakes up at a respectable 9:00, takes a shower, makes coffee, looks at her schedule for the day and thinks to herself, “there’s no way this is happening, but let’s give it a shot, America”, contemplates going back to bed, decides not to (most of the time), then walks 15 minutes to her class up the Memorial Steps (yikes), breaking a severe sweat on the way up. Rachel rolls out of bed at a solid 10:24 a.m., brushes her teeth, and somehow still makes it to her class on time. We gotta catch these zzz’s by any means possible, and Rachel takes the cake for this one. Merilla gets super excited when she manages to snag 6 hours of sleep.

Pros to Off Campus: A Normal-Sized Bed
Speaking of sleep, having a double bed is arguably the best possibility about living on campus. Upgrading from a tiny, twin XL makes a huge difference. Merilla is finally able to take up all the space she needs (and deserves) and has such a comfortable mattress that it’s a miracle she ever gets out of bed. As they say, once you go double bed, you never go back.

Cons to On Campus: Dealing with Certain Tufts Services Whose Names We Won’t Say Out Loud (*COUGH* F A C I L I T I E S *COUGH*)
Rachel loves SoGo. She really does. But it’s not without its faults. For example, her window has been broken ever since she arrived on campus. She put in a work order for it to get fixed, and after a very long time, and without any warning, it was “fixed”, and proceeded to break one day later. She has since put in another work order and is patiently waiting, but there is a very good chance the open window has made her room so chilly, she might have the flu. We don’t know. Well, we actually know, but Rachel is in denial. She’s the perfect pillar of health right now it’s fine!!!!

Cons to Off Campus: Responsibility and Looming Adulthood

Remembering to pay rent every month and utilities (on two separate days of the month, mind you) is stressful. Living in your own house is the first step toward adulthood, and believe us, neither of us is ready to be an adult, especially Merilla. If something breaks, you can’t just call facilities to fix it. You have to do it. Or at the very least, you have to call your landlord and hope they get someone to fix it. Merilla changed two lightbulbs the other night, and it required all three of her floormates’ efforts and took about 30 minutes. Living in your own house requires faking being an adult until you make it, and Merilla’s only good at this half the time.

Cons to On Campus: Social Life
Ugh, guys. Living on campus means you’re around…people, and Rachel does not have time for people. She only has time for listening to “Gilmore Guys” while watching Gilmore Girls. This might seem like a pro, but hanging out with people is the worst. Like, I’m sorry, Trish but I did not ask to hear about your extremely productive day. I don’t even know who you are. Wait, why are you in my suite?

Cons to Off Campus: Social Life
Merilla also doesn’t have a social life. She goes full days without seeing friends, because she is a legit hermit who lives half of her life in Eaton. If you asked her to name the people who live in her house, she could probably only name a third of them on a good day. #SocialInteractionIsOverratedPassItOn.

Conclusion: Squat in Gifford House
Prime location. Nice backyard. Easy access to brunch with President Monaco. What more could you ask for?

Stay weird, y’all.

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